Mom is Stuck, the Phone, and Friendly’s

“There is no such thing as a good call at 7 AM. It’s been my experience that all calls between the hours of 11 PM and 9 AM are disaster calls” -Janet Evanovich

I was standing outside of Friendly’s restaurant in Greenfield MA when I got the Facebook message: “Mom is stuck.” I had no idea what “mom is stuck” meant…is mom stuck in her wheelchair, stuck on an idea, stuck in a rut? So, even though I was supposed to be on a date with my partner who admittedly I had been neglecting recently- a dying mom will do that, I called my sister. Standing outside of Friendly’s, the car full of Christmas decorations, in the cold December evening I learned what “stuck” meant.

Apparently, since Dad had been home mom had been unable to move, talk, or do anything. Kate and I both hoped that the stuck would be temporary, but we prepared ourselves for not just in case. Dad had called Hospice and apparently this was okay as long as she was breathing normally which she was. So, with nothing else to be done, I went and had Friendly’s. I ordered a turkey Supermelt with French fries, and we split a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup sundae for dessert. It was absolutely delicious, and I didn’t cry inside the restaurant once. But, the focus of the conservation was on Mom and stuck. I wondered out loud if this was it, was this her new norm? Would she come back? If not what would we do? I remained focused on Mom being stuck for the remainder of the evening and while I did not cry inside of Friendly’s once I did cry before I went into Friendly’s, driving home on 91, and once when we got home. PSP sucks like that- I don’t want my entire life to be wrapped up in PSP, and I know it takes a toll on every single relationship I have. I know my partner wanted us to be ordinary 30-somethings getting ready for Christmas, going out for dinner, talking about work, school, and our holiday plans, but again I drove and cried, and I was so focused on what “stuck” might look like.

As was our new normal, I messaged Kate a lot that night as we sat by and waited on standby and when the next morning Mom woke up “unstuck” we celebrated this small victory over PSP. As the months wore on, the “mom is stuck” message would be repeated. In fact, “Mom is stuck” just became a normal part of the interactions between Kate, Dad, Luke, and I. We all learned that stuck would happen and that she would unstick, and maybe someday she would not unstick. But, all that we could and can do is what we had done since she started falling- wait and see and take it one day at a time, that powerless feeling that is just a part of PSP.

Everything in my life over the past two years has been impacted and shaped by the backdrop of “Mom is dying.” This dinner at Friendly’s and “Mom is stuck” was not unlike any other outing I have taken since her diagnosis. My phone remains on all the time, and I wait.

I wait for the message from Kate, the call from Dad, when she was home it was the calls from RAVNAH and now the occasional call from the nursing home. The phone and I have a complicated relationship. For example, when I am relaxing at home or even in bed with my phone in another room when the phone rings or pings both my partner and I go running. I want the phone to be somewhere else, and I want not to have to jump whenever I hear it, yet, I can’t not. Especially when Mom was home, we were on constant alert, with constant anxiety, and I was tethered to my phone. The phone is often the bearer of some new horror of life-changing/interrupting thing that just can’t wait. So, I manage the phone in between normal everyday life- just because my mom is dying does not mean the world stops (even on those days I wish it did).